Courses

Fall 2016

INAF 309 - Australian / New Zealand Tutorial
Independent Study 
Faculty: Alan Tidwell
 

INAF 314 - Immigration and Conflict: Australian and American Experience
Tuesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Faculty: Gregory Brown

Migration is variously characterized as an important determinant of national identity, political instability, cultural power, imperial expansion, ethnic conflict, radicalism, terrorism, environmental degradation, and economic  growth or stagnation. In high immigration receiving states such as Australia and the United States--among the world's most inclusive migrant incorporation regimes--migration and global mobility more generally complicate foreign policy making choices and present special challenges and opportunities for advancing national interests. This course will examine the migration-security nexus and the policy choices that Australia and the United States confront. Fundamental questions include: What causes people to migrate across national borders and settle in foreign countries? What are the benefits and costs of migration for migrants, sending countries, and receiving states ? How do migrants in Australia and the United States maintain social and political relationships with those back in their home countries, and does this affect their sense of national allegiance and social integration into their host societies? To what extent do migrants and their descendants alter foreign policy considerations or affect international relations? And how do Australians and Americans cope with conflicts between ethnic or migrant communities when those conflicts originate, or are strongly fueled by, homeland conflicts?

INAF 364 - Land, Indigenous Peoples and Conflict
Thursdays 3:30-6p.m.
Faculty: Alan Tidwell

One can be forgiven for thinking of land as a commodity, after all, in the West that’s what land is. For many people around the globe, however, land is not a commodity to be sold or traded. Rather, land and life are synonymous. A reading of history will remind us that wars have been fought over land. Settlers coming to the Americas, Australia, New Zealand and other places have fought with indigenous people over the possession of land. All too often we think of these conflicts as historical relics, and the stuff of legend and film. Nothing could be further from the truth. Today, numerous conflicts simmer over land tenure and sometimes they boil over. 

In this course we will examine the nexus of land, conflict and indigenous peoples. What are some of the contending views of land and its use? What are the histories of indigenous people losing their land?  How have indigenous people come to fight for their land? How have land conflicts been managed? What is the way forward? 

INAF 367 - Trade in Asia Pacific
Wednesdays 5-7:30 p.m.
Faculty: John Mullen

The course will examine the various tracks to achieving economic integration through a region-wide free trade agreement, the geopolitical issues that will have to be addressed in the process, and why this is important. Starting with how to define Asia-Pacific, its importance to the United States, and Australia’s and New Zealand’s Asian-Western identities, the course will consider the region’s post WWII history and alliances and the more recent political architecture such as APEC, ASEAN, and the East Asia Summit. The course then will focus on the global post-WWII trading system and the range of free trade agreements among countries in the region, with an intensive examination of the origins, prospects and goals of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), and how that possible track to a region-wide agreement such as FTAAP compares to a broader Asian track that includes China and perhaps India. Finally the course will consider security and political challenges to regional integration, how cooperation on a range of science, technology, and transnational issues may affect the outcome, and what is possible versus what is likely in pursuit of a transformational 21st Century goal.

INAF-390 Australian-American Alliance
Tuesdays, Thursdays 9:30-10:45 a.m.
Faculty: Claude Rakisits

This course examines the history, evolution and contemporary challenges in the Australian-American relationship. In broad terms, both Australia and the U.S. share a language, many cultural forms and traits, and a deep commitment to democratic ideals. Today, both share many common interests and challenges. Both have deep interests in Asia, which today drive their deep strategic relationship embodied in the ANZUS Treaty. This course focuses on the evolution of the Australian-American relationship from shared cultural and political ideals through to the evolution of the strategic alliance formed in the aftermath of World War II and deepened in the ensuing years.

Spring 2017

INAF 319 - Peace and Security in the Indo-Pacific Region
Tuesdays, Thursdays 9:30-10:45 a.m.
Faculty: Claude Rakisits

This course will examine the strategic picture of the region, focusing on the issues which will make this region increasingly a critical factor in global stability.  Some of the issues which will be analyzed will include: the on-going Indo-Pakistan rivalry; the growing Indo-Chinese competition in the Indian Ocean; increasing tension between China and Japan; the volatility of the Korean Peninsula; the competing maritime claims in the South China Sea; and the role of regional organizations.  We will also examine the foreign policy of some of the key countries in the Indo-Pacific, such as Australia, Indonesia, China, Japan and India.  Students will be expected to choose an Indo-Pacific country on which they will give a presentation as well as write an essay. 

INAF 366 - Extractive Industries and Conflict
Thursdays 3:30-6:00 p.m.
Faculty: Alan Tidwell

In recent years economists, political scientists and international development professionals have pointed to the relationship between extractive industries (oil, gas and mining) and violent conflict. Over the course of the past two centuries the link between extractive industries and violent conflict has been manifest. Labor unrest, community conflict, and warfare have all featured in the tremendous growth of the extractive sector. Today, many think of mines as violent places. What are the stories of violent conflict and the extractive industries? What are the underlying dynamics of these conflicts? What methods have been developed to help better manage and resolve these conflicts? This class draws on history, political science, development studies and conflict resolution to investigate the relationship between violent conflict and extractive industries.

INAF 314 - Immigration and Conflict: Australian and American Experiences
Tuesdays 5:00-7:30 p.m.
Faculty: Gregory Brown

Migration is variously characterized as an important determinant of national identity, political instability, cultural power, imperial expansion, ethnic conflict, radicalism, terrorism, environmental degradation, and economic  growth or stagnation. In high immigration receiving states such as Australia and the United States--among the world's most inclusive migrant incorporation regimes--migration and global mobility more generally complicate foreign policy making choices and present special challenges and opportunities for advancing national interests. This course will examine the migration-security nexus and the policy choices that Australia and the United States confront. Fundamental questions include: What causes people to migrate across national borders and settle in foreign countries? What are the benefits and costs of migration for migrants, sending countries, and receiving states ? How do migrants in Australia and the United States maintain social and political relationships with those back in their home countries, and does this affect their sense of national allegiance and social integration into their host societies? To what extent do migrants and their descendants alter foreign policy considerations or affect international relations? And how do Australians and Americans cope with conflicts between ethnic or migrant communities when those conflicts originate, or are strongly fueled by, homeland conflicts?